Outputs

Welcome to the outputs section of our website.  

Here you will find links to publications, videos and audio outputs that we have created, many of which illuminate or expand on our current or past events and exhibitions.

For more information on our project, please visit the About Us section of our website.

  • David Olusoga delivers the Migration Museum Annual Lecture 2018: ‘The Perils of Our Insular Illusion’

    Historian, producer, presenter and Migration Museum trustee David Olusoga delivered our 2018 Annual Lecture at SOAS on 22 November 2018, arguing that, to make sense of contemporary Britain, we need to recover the global aspects of our history and culture. Read more

  • David Olusoga speaking at the launch of Room to Breathe

    Watch historian, producer and presenter David Olusoga, one of our Distinguished Friends, speaking at the launch of our Room to Breathe exhibition on 31 October 2018. Read more

  • Moving Hearts

    A video on Moving Hearts, a collaboration between Australian artist Penny Ryan and Professor Anna Reading and Dr James Bjork from King’s College London in 2018. Moving Hearts built on Penny’s Connecting Hearts Project, which has involved 1000s of people in Sydney reflecting on their connection with people seeking asylum, particularly those in detention. We hosted a series of art workshops… Read more

  • The ‘Other’ Side of the Pond: The Good Immigrant USA

    To mark the launch of The Good Immigrant USA, its editor Chimene Suleyman and contributors to the best-selling UK edition Inua Ellams and Darren Chetty joined us at the Migration Museum in March 2019 to read from the new collection of essays and compare the current state of discussions and debates around identity, culture, language and belonging on both sides of the Atlantic.  Read more

  • Moving Stories – competition with OCR

    A video showcasing our inaugural Moving Stories competition, in partnership with exam board OCR, in which teams of students studying OCR’s migration GCSE history units were invited to design a new exhibition based on an aspect of their studies, with the winning team jetting off to New York City in summer 2018. Read more

  • No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain

    A video showcasing our exhibition No Turning Back: Seven Migration Moments that Changed Britain. Read more

  • Migration Museum 2017 Annual Lecture with Gary Younge

    Journalist and author Gary Younge looks at how immigration is understood in the current age and what the consequences are in terms of migration, social anxiety and democracy. Read more

  • George Alagiah at the launch of Migration Museum at The Workshop

    BBC newsreader and journalist George Alagiah, one of our Distinguished Friends, spoke at the launch of the Migration Museum at The Workshop in May 2017. Read more

  • Migration Museum at The Workshop Launch

    Highlights of the launch party for our Migration Museum at The Workshop. Read more

  • The Open University presents: Migrants at the Centre – Looking beyond Marginalisation and Exclusion

    A video of a talk organised by The Open University and hosted at the Migration Museum at The Workshop in July 2017, in in which academics and third sector representatives came together to problematise the ‘migrant as outsider’ discourse. Read more

  • The Open University presents: Statelessness as Displacement in Situ

    A video of a talk organised by The Open University and hosted at the Migration Museum at The Workshop in July 2017, in which participants discussed statelessness as displacement and looked at what this means for our wider understanding of displacement, expulsion, and exclusion from states and international systems. Read more

  • Call me by my name – Curator’s insights

    Curator Sue McAlpine takes us behind the scenes to explain the objectives and approach to the Migration Museum Project’s exhibition Call me by name: stories from Calais and beyond. Read more

  • Lily Ebert

    Lily Ebert tells the incredible story of her small gold pendant, a photograph of which features in our 100 Images of Migration exhibition. Read more

  • Audio stories from Room to Breathe

    A selection of audio food stories from our Room to Breathe exhibition. Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 1 – The Swarming of the English

    Mass emigration from England first took off in the 17th century with the colonisation of America and the Caribbean. The number of people leaving the shores of England was huge and unprecedented. Mukti Jain Campion speaks to historian James Evans, author of Emigrants:Why the English Sailed to the New World and to American historian Dr Linford Fisher to find out how those early English settlers fared and how Native Americans responded to the incursion of their lands. Read more

  • Departures podcast: 400 years of emigration from Britain

    Departures is a new podcast from the Migration Museum exploring 400 years of emigration from Britain. Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 2 – Maidens’ Voyage

    In the early 17th century shiploads of young women were despatched to America by the Virginia Company of London. It was hoped they would marry the English planters in Jamestown and help grow the new colony. But who were these young women prepared to travel thousands of miles across the ocean in search of a husband? And how did they fare? Mukti Jain Campion talks to Jennifer Potter, author of The Jamestown Brides: The Bartered Wives of the New World. Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 3 – The Company Men in India

    From the beginning of the 17th century when the first ships of the English East India Company set sail from London, tens of thousands of men from Britain ventured out to live an expat life in a country that was completely different to anything they had previously known. Most never returned. Mukti Jain Campion speaks to historians William Dalrymple, Professor Rudrangshu Mukherjee, Dr Kate Teltscher and to Gurminder Bhambra, Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies at the University of Sussex, to find out more about the Company men who went to India and how their actions brought profound change for both Britain and India. Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 4 – Emigration and Enslavement

    Episode 4: Emigration and Enslavement The 17th century colonisation of North America and the Caribbean by emigrants from the British Isles was, almost from its beginning, dependent on the brutal forced transatlantic migration of millions of enslaved African people. Their labour made possible the industrial-scale production of lucrative crops such as tobacco, sugar and cotton… Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 5 – The Leaving of Liverpool

    From the early 19th century to the beginning of the First World War, over 10 million British people migrated. Over half of these emigrants left from the port of Liverpool. Mukti Jain Campion talks to Ian Murphy, Director of the Merseyside Maritime Museum, to discover how the port of Liverpool became the gateway to millions of new lives abroad, and examines the importance of printed propaganda in fuelling 19th century British emigration with Dr Fariha Shaikh, author and Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Birmingham. Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 6 – A Welsh Utopia in Patagonia

    In May 1865, 153 men, women and children set sail from Liverpool to travel to the other side of the world.  Their dream was to build a new homeland, somewhere they could speak Welsh, govern themselves and pursue their religion and culture without interference. A romantic vision that took them 8,000 miles to the remote Chubut valley in Argentina. Did their dream of a Welsh utopia come true? And what impact did their arrival have on indigenous people who already called this region home? Mukti Jain Campion speaks to Professor Lucy Taylor of Aberystwyth University who has studied the archives of the Welsh in Patagonia, and Gareth Jenkins who has traced a family from his own village in Montgomeryshire that was amongst the early migrants. Read more

  • Departures podcast episode 7 – The Left Behind Wives of Cornwall

    When we speak of emigration we tend to think of the people who leave to go abroad. But what about the families and communities left at home? In 19th century Cornwall this was a pressing question. As the once-thriving local mining industry went into decline, thousands of men left each year to find better paid jobs abroad. They were often gone for years, leaving wives and families to cope alone and rely on remittances that didn’t always come. Mukti Jain Campion speaks to Dr Lesley Trotter author of The Married Widows of Cornwall to find out how these so-called “left behind” wives survived and why their stories are so important to understand the full story of migration. Amanda Drake also shares a poignant letter sent by her 19th century ancestor. Read more

  • Migrants Mean Business – Karen Blackett in conversation with David Abraham

    Episode 3 of Migrants Mean Business features Karen Blackett, UK Country Manager for WPP and Chairwoman of MediaCom, in conversation with David Abraham Read more

  • Migrants Mean Business with George Alagiah – Sir Lloyd Dorfman

    Episode 2 of Migrants Mean Business features a conversation between George Alagiah and entrepreneur and philanthropist Sir Lloyd Dorfman CBE. Lloyd founded Travelex at the age of 24 from one small shop in London and grew it to become the world’s largest foreign exchange specialist. Lloyd and George’s wide-ranging conversation explores Lloyd’s business and philanthropic career, his family roots and Jewish identity, the essence of entrepreneurialism and whether one ever stops being a ‘migrant’. Read more

  • Migrants Mean Business with George Alagiah – Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou

    To kick off our Migrants Mean Business series, we’ve got a cracking conversation with one of the most charismatic and recognisable business leaders of the past few decades – Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou. His conversation with Daniel Franklin, executive and diplomatic editor of The Economist, ranges from shipping to dog walking, suing Netflix to going head to head with Ryanair’s Michael O’Leary. Read more

  • What role does the media play in the national debate around migration?

    Listen to a panel discussion on the role of the media in shaping and influencing the national debate around migration, featuring Liz Gerard, former Times journalist and independent blogger of the year; Jakub Krupa, UK correspondent for the Polish Press Agency; Abdulwahab Tahhan, a Syria-born, UK-based journalist. The discussion was chaired by Sunder Katwala, director of British Future and former journalist. Read more

  • Lady Kishwar Desai on Partition, 70 years on

    Listen to our 2017 LSE–MMP annual lecture on Partition, 70 years on, given by Lady Kishwar Desai. Read more

  • Robert Tombs on English migration history

    On 18 November 2015, Robert Tombs delivered our second Annual Lecture in partnership with the London School of Economics and Political Sciences. Listen to the audio podcast. Read more

  • Michael Rosen on The Languages of Migration

    Michael Rosen speaking in a thoughtful pose, gesturing with one hand, holding his notes in the other

    Audio podcast and transcript of Michael Rosen’s The Languages of Migration talk for the Migration Museum Project – London School of Economics inaugural annual Public Lecture. Read more

  • Migration in the Digital Age audio

    Immigration used to involve packing an entire life into a suitcase and moving to a new country for good. Now, with modern communications and transport, it is far more fluid and dynamic. Modern migrants need not lose contact with their old homes; they can keep old ties refreshed; and families can span the globe. Children… Read more

  • DNA and Migration audio

    There’s been a huge explosion of interest in genetic genealogy and personal DNA testing. But how much do we know about Read more