Archives

Taking Care of Business: Exhibition Guide for Educators

This exhibition guide is designed to help you get to know the exhibition, where best to look to discover stories that relate to your learning goals. We have identified historical examples that will ground your students learning in the context of the long story of migration to and from Britain. We have highlighted the stories most suitable for primary students and explained how to make the most of your time with us.

Love Without Borders for Refugees

This art-making class is modelled upon the workshops that originated with Kayra Martinez in refugee camps in Greece.  Whilst Kayra was working with refugee youth, she developed art-making workshops as an outlet for self-expression and storytelling. This guided process includes painting on canvas and is transferrable to non-refugee school children as a means for discussing migration, immigration, and the refugee crisis. Results include teacher-led classes that exhibit and discuss their artwork with specific regards to the migration process.

Where are you from?

It can be a struggle to answer the inevitable question: ‘Where are you from?’ when you’re not quite sure. A young woman of mixed heritage searches for an answer by looking back over three generations of her family. Documents, family stories and of course the British staple of tea and biscuits help her figure out a way to reply.

A personal look at questions of identity, at a time where migration, political isolation and reclaiming history are hot topics. Is it important to look to your own past in order to better respond to wider issues present today?

Talking About Race

Talking about race, although hard, is necessary. This resource has been created by the Smithsonian for educators to help with opening a discussion about race. It looks at the historical foundations of race, being anti-racist and building a community, as well as providing the tools and guidance to explore this topic whether you are teaching infants, adults, or any age in between. There’s no quick or foolproof way to talk about the complexities of race. But, it’s a conversation we all need to have, no matter your race, background, education or experience. What and how the history of race in America is presented is an opportunity to engage in thoughtful, respectful, and productive conversations.